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Flashback, an exhibition of photographs by Tony Figueira

Tony Figueira_Defiance.jpg

Defiance, 1990 (printed 2014)

Tony Figueira_SA Out Now!.jpg

SA Out Now!, 1989 (printed c. 2014)

For years during the turbulent pre-independent time of the 80s, and early years of Namibian independence, Tony Figueira documented the struggle for liberation and created a photographic archive of a wide variety of activities. From trade union rallies to the return of Namibia’s Founding President, Dr. Sam Nujoma, and South Africa’s exit from the country, These early photographs mark the beginning of a photographic practice that continued to capture the ongoing journey of Namibia and her people over the next 27 years. 

Tony Figueira_Dr Sam Nujoma _ Dirk Mudge

A Younger Dr Nujoma 1989 (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_Jubilant (1990).jpg

Jubilant, 1990 (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_Namibia will be free.jpg

Namibia will be free, 1990 (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_Celebrating the return.jpg

Celebrating the return, 1989 (printed c. 2016)

Tony Figueira_Workers Unite!.jpg

Workers Unite!, 1989 (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_Untitled (Kids).jpg

21 March 2020 marks the thirtieth birthday of Namibia’s independence from South Africa. Through showcasing some of Figueira’s historical and more contemporary photographs, this exhibition provides a glimpse into the past and demands a moment of reflection.

Untitled (Kids), Undated (printed c. 2014)

As with any historic photography collection these images are fascinating because they create a time capsule. Recognisable figures like Dr. Sam Nujoma stand young and tall and we are reminded that it was their youth that fueled the fires of resistance. We are left to ponder over what happened to the other, lesser known individuals. How did independence affect their lives? The jubilance of independence and the hardships endured by the Namibian people under apartheid are all starkly visible in the images on display. Unfortunately much of this hardship continues into the current era and we are forced to ask why this is the case.

Tony Figueira_A younger Dr Geingob.jpg

A Younger Dr Geingob, Undated (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_On the move.jpg

On the move, undated (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_Celebration _ Concern.jpg

Celebration & Concern, 1990 (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_WIKA.jpg

WIKA, Undated (printed c. 2014)

In even the harshest times Figueira had an eye for whimsy. School desks, piled on top of one another, make for an exciting jumble that does more than hint at a painful dysfunctionality. Further back in time, in photographs of protest we see the mechanisms of play at work. With dancing, running and the raising of voices, Namibians took to the streets, risking their lives for a hard won freedom. 

Tony Figueira_Untitled (School desks).jp

Untitled (School Desks), Undated (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_SWAPO Rally (Double Exposu

SWAPO Rally (Double Exposure), Undated (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_SWAPO Rally.jpg

SWAPO Rally, 1989 (printed c. 2016)

These pictures show how play can also function as a form of protest. In these images, young Namibians demand the space to play, and the active use of that space to display acts of freedom that are so often denied by long histories of economic and political repression. Figueira’s works provide us with important juxtapositions which remind us that the freedom to play is often reserved for only the most privileged members of society. At a festival we see white bodies exercising this freedom, in moments of joy and celebration. In the context of these images we are reminded that these freedoms are still not accessible to everyone. 

Tony Figueira_The Youth (i).jpg

The Youth (i), 1989 (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_The Youth (ii).jpg

The Youth (ii), Undated (printed c. 2014)

By focusing on these playful moments Figueira has rejected the notion that it is only through images of abjection and poverty that we can come to understand adversity and pain. A thirtieth birthday is surely a time for celebration, just as much as it is a time to reinvigorate and rekindle the spirit of protest. 
 

Tony Figueira_Unveiling (Nelson Mandela)

Unveiling (Nelson Mandela), 1993 (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_Angola Votes.jpg

Angola Votes, c. 1992 (printed c. 2014)

Tony Figueira_Untitled (Youngster).jpg

To read more about Tony Figueira visit his artist's page HERE, where you can also see which works are available for sale. You can also download the e-catalogue HERE

Untitled (youngster) , Undated (printed c. 2014)

More about this exhibition

With the decision to change this into an online only exhibtion (covid-19 has hit Namibia and it seemed wise to get on board with flattening the curve right away!) we decided to create a little more content than usual. The clips bellow feature StArt curator Gina Figueira as she talks us through the exhibtion. It was originally planned that the exhibition would open at The Project Room (20/03/2020) and we are very grateful to Frieda Lühl for her continued collaboration.